Expect Success!

by Brian P. Moran

Henry Ford once famously said "If you think you can, or if you think you can't; you're right." He knew that your belief in your capability determined what you would achieve. Not your skill, talents, education, or opportunities; your beliefs determine your future!

Expectations are powerful. We tend to perform according to expectations. Research has shown that expectations of an event can actually cause it to happen. Over fifty years ago Robert K. Merten, a sociologist at Columbia University, first documented the phenomenon of the self-fulfilling prophecy. The essence of the self-fulfilling prophecy starts with a belief that is not necessarily true at the time it is held. But, when the belief is acted on it tends to produce a situation that becomes true. Beliefs create reality.

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Brian P. MoranExpect Success!

Here We Go Again

by Brian P. Moran

Are you one of the over 130 million Americans that set New Year’s Resolutions?  If so, it’s likely that you’ve failed with them in the past.  How do I know this?  Because 92% of those that set resolutions, fail.  And, by-the-way, that same statistic holds true for goal setting in general.

The end of the year is a great time to take stock and determine the areas that we would like to improve.  January rolls around and millions make commitments to lose weight, be a better spouse or parent, to quit smoking, get a new job, stick to the budget, the list goes on.

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Brian P. MoranHere We Go Again

The Power of Commitment

by Brian P. Moran

I remember back when I was a young boy in fifth grade and how I yearned for a new ten-speed bicycle. Boy, was it a beauty; metal-flake green paint with racing tires and a black leather saddle. The problem was it was a hundred bucks, which was a lot of money for a 10-year old kid back then. But that didn’t stop me. I had to have that bike. I did anything and everything I could to earn money.

There was no way I was not going to own that bike. There were times when I thought about quitting, and sometimes those thoughts almost won-out. Work, or go the movies with my friends, play baseball, or just watch Saturday morning cartoons? What kept me going was a mental picture of that bike beneath me as I was riding around the neighborhood – the ultimate definition of freedom for a 10-year old! I’ll never forget how excited I was buying the bike and bringing it home, and how proud I was as I rode it down my street.

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Brian P. MoranThe Power of Commitment

Leaders Forum

by Brian P. Moran

I recently returned from a fabulous trip to San Diego.  I was invited to speak at one of my client’s conferences: their Leader’s Forum. The purpose of this Leader’s Forum was to bring people together to celebrate their success, and build their capabilities to achieve even more.  I love meetings like this!  The whole notion of leaders and leadership is at the heart of why the 12 Week Year exists.

With all the books and articles written about leadership and the characteristics of effective leaders it becomes almost overwhelming trying to keep up with the “habits” and “laws” of what makes for good leaders.   And yet, two characteristics that I’ve seen that are fairly consistent across all levels of leadership are celebration and development.

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Brian P. MoranLeaders Forum

How to Boost Your Effectiveness by 400 Percent

by Brian P. Moran

inc-300x114As seen in INC. Magazine January 2014.

Viewing the year as 12 weeks rather than 12 months can make you four times as efficient.
Here's why.

Want to reach your goals four times faster this year than you did in 2013? You can make it happen by treating every quarter as though it were a year unto itself, says Brian Moran, author of ‘The 12 Week Year.’

This insight came to him, he says, after he observed his executive coaching clients had lots of great ideas but fell down when it came time to execute them. Now, he says, "Everything we do is designed to help people execute better. "Knowledge is only power if you act on it."

To help people act on their plans more, Moran suggests thinking of the "year" as 12 weeks instead of 12 months. Otherwise, you may fall victim to what he calls "annualized thinking."

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Brian P. MoranHow to Boost Your Effectiveness by 400 Percent

A Little Extra

by Brian P. Moran

It was a fun summer for the Moran family.  Unfortunately, the fun included too much food and drink, and now I’m faced with losing a few pounds of extra me.  So I’m back training and eating better.

As I was out for one of my runs the other day I had a revelation (as I sometimes do when I run), actually a double revelation – sounds like quite a run, I know.  Nevertheless, I had two insights that I want to share with you.  To start with you need to know that I don’t enjoy running.   I don’t look forward to it, or feel like I miss it when I don’t do it.  And I most certainly don’t get a “runners high,” not even close.  What I get might be better classified as an “unpleasant experience that can’t end soon enough; high,” if you can call that a high; anyway, my revelations.

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Brian P. MoranA Little Extra

This column will change your life: must a year last 52 weeks?

by Brian P. Moran

What if we switched to a different personal calendar? By adopting a 12 week perspective, we might finally abandon the futile, misery-inducing notion of "work-life balance."

At this very special point in the calendar – as a new year lies waiting, full of promise, undisturbed like freshly fallen snow – I like to indulge my contrarianism by pointing out that New Year is a completely arbitrary marker, with no meaning beyond any we choose to give it. The year begins on 1 January because the Romans decided it would – and isn't it vaguely troubling that the rhythms of your life are partly determined by men in togas who cleaned their teeth with urine? Admittedly, the length of the year is less arbitrary: one year every four seasons makes sense if you're a farmer. But for those of us who till the fields of the modern knowledge economy – we information farmers, to use a phrase I plan to trademark and make millions from – neither the New Year nor the year-long perspective need be seen as non-negotiable. Which prompts a question: what if you switched to a different personal calendar instead?

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Brian P. MoranThis column will change your life: must a year last 52 weeks?

Rigor and Rhythm

by Brian P. Moran

As an athlete, consistently performing at your best demands mental toughness and physical rigor.  The same principle applies in areas outside of athletics as well.  To be great at anything requires dedicated effort.

So much of society today is geared at creating comfort.  Now don’t get me wrong, there is nothing inherently bad about comfort.  But I think sometimes we forget that growth by it’s very nature is uncomfortable.  If I’m focused on comfort, and think that somehow everything should be easy, and anything that isn’t is just not worth pursing, then I never improve.

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Brian P. MoranRigor and Rhythm

12 Weeks to My First Book

by Brian P. Moran

Our new book launches this week and it will be available in book stores and online.  I have to say, as professionally as I can: WE’RE GEEKED!  The new expanded 12 Week Year has the best of the first book, and it’s been improved with an application section – it’s now a complete stand-alone resource.  In fact, as I look at Barnes and Noble today we are #1 for the week!

It’s interesting to look back to the time when Mike and I first wrote the precursor to the 12 Week Year, Periodization.  It was in late November of 2002 and we knew we would be attending LAMP, an insurance industry conference, in mid-March.  We were trying to decide what we would do to promote and market our services and we decided to write a book.

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Brian P. Moran12 Weeks to My First Book

Family Time

by Brian P. Moran

I just returned from that annual mass exodus from the state of Michigan know as spring break.  In Michigan spring break is a big deal.  By the time April rolls around nearly everyone is tired of winter and it seems that most of the state heads south (or wishes they could).  As for the Moran’s, we set our sights on Orlando this year as we usually do.  I’ve found that these spring vacations are great opportunities to create memories that become a permanent part of our family story.

One of my goals with my two girls is to be the biggest influence in their lives.  I want to be the one who shapes their values and their character, not their friends, not Instagram, and certainly not MTV (which for the record, they’ve never seen).   I’ve shared this intention with a few people over the years and some of them scoffed at the idea.  Interestingly, these tend to be the same people whose kids have run amuck.  Either way, I’m undeterred.

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Brian P. MoranFamily Time